Author Archives: Maike van Stiphout

The end of the stone gardens in Baden-Würthemberg

The stone garden increases the climat problems such as heatstress and stormwater floods in the neighbourhoods. Since a few days a stone garden is forbidden in Baden-Würthemberg. Their garden-legislation (1995) prescribed that paving is only allowed where it is really needed. The recent garden trend to replace plants by small pebbles was not foreseen and not stopped. The film explains to the inhabitants why the new law is made and how to change the garden.

film in: https://www.swr.de/swraktuell/baden-wuerttemberg/schottergaerten-ministerien-uneins-100.html

4 features for succesfull wildlife-inclusive urban design

(Landscape and Urban planning/Volume 200, August 2020, Beate Apfelbeck e.a.)

In an urbanizing world there is an increasing priority for making cities nature-inclusive environments. Cities offer places for human-wildlife experiences, and thus for broad societal support of biodiversity conservation. Cities also depend on ecosystem services provided by biodiversity to remain healthy, liveable places. Although biodiversity is frequently addressed in urban green infrastructure plans, it often is not an integral topic in city planning, urban design and housing development. As a result, wildlife-rich urban green is often lacking in those parts of the cities where people live and work. Here, the authors introduce the concept of ‘wildlife-inclusive urban design’ for the built-up area of cities that integrates animal needs into the urban planning and design process. To identify key features that determine the success of wildlife-inclusive urban design, they evaluated lessons learnt from existing best practices. These were collected during an international workshop with architects, landscape practitioners, ecological consultants, conservationists and urban ecologists. in which Maike van Stiphout participated as well.

The authors propose that features of successful wildlife-inclusive urban design projects are:

1) interdisciplinary design teams that involve ecologists early on,

2) consideration of the entire life-cycle of target species,

3) post-occupancy monitoring and evaluation with feedback to communicate best practices

4) stakeholder involvement and participatory approaches.

The authors propose how wildlife-inclusive urban design could be included into the different steps of the urban planning cycle. They conclude that following these principles will facilitate incorporation of wildlife-inclusive urban design into urban planning and design and enable urban environments where humans and animals can thrive in the built-up areas.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0169204619308035?via%3Dihub

The botanical city

authors: Matthew Gandy, Sandra Jasper

Roadside “weeds” and other routinely overlooked aspects to urban nature provide a fascinating glimpse into complex global ecologies and new cultures of nature emerging across the world. This unique collection of essays explores the botanical dimensions of urban space, ranging from scientific efforts to understand the distinctive dynamics of urban flora to the way spontaneous vegetation has inspired artists and writers.
The book comprises five thematic sections: “Histories and taxonomies,” “Botanizing the asphalt,” “The art of urban flora,” “Experiments in non-design,” and “Cartographic imaginations”. The essays explore developments in Berlin, London, Lahore, Tokyo, and many other cities, as well as more philosophical reflections on the meaning of urban nature under the putative shift to the Anthropocene.

Designing for biodiversity in neighbourhoods

What can you do in the urban lay-out and the landscape design in neighbourhoods to make space for wildlife? The Bundesamt für Naturshutz made a hands-on brochure. The brochure is filled with blueprints of neighbourhoods enriched with proposals. The proposals have been discussed with housing corporations and communities. The strategy named AAD – Animal Aided Design, is developed by Thomas Hauck (University Kassel) and Wolfgang Weisser (TU Munchen)

Brochure link: .https://www.bfn.de/fileadmin/BfN/planung/siedlung/Dokumente/AAD_Broschuere.pdf

New York City introduces bill to make glass buildings more bird-friendly

New York has passed a bill that updates the city’s building code with requirements to make new glass structures safer for migratory birds.

New York City Council’s bill requires the surface of new glass buildings rising 75 feet (23 metres) or more – approximately seven storeys – to be patterned to make them more visible to birds.

New York’s chapter of the American Institute of Architects, the American Bird Conservancy, and New York City Audubon all supported the legislation, as reported by CityLab.

The bill includes a set of bird-friendly design and construction guidelines that advise the use of fritted glass – which features ceramic lines or dotted marks on the surface. This adaptation would reduce the transparency of clear glass buildings, making them more visible to birds.

Existing glazed towers are not affected by the new mandate but any renovations are required to comply. New structures built on top of a green roof, no matter the height, must meet new requirements. (21-12-19 Dezeen, Bridged Cogley)

link: https://www.dezeen.com/2019/12/20/new-york-city-bird-bill-glass-buildings/

bird friendly handbook: https://nextcity.nl/downloads/

Toolbox building with nature

Make “building with nature” the new standard, is the slogan of the makers of the toolbox launched the 20th of November on the congress Natuurlijk! in Olst. The Dutch toolbox for building with nature is there. Every developer, architect, city maker and housing association can find on the website all the information about species that like to live with us in urban areas. And the website will be improved daily by its users.

link website: https://bouwnatuurinclusief.nl/#

link congres Natuurlijk!: https://www.biind.nl/artikel/congres-natuurlijk-laaiend-succes-voor-mens-én-natuur?utm_source=Biind&utm_campaign=5bc688a59b-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_26_09_19_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_a6e3d8d2b6-5bc688a59b-227032101

Nature inclusive in Draft National Strategy on Spacial planning and the Environment (NOVI)

“In the future, the Netherlands will have set aside more space for nature, by more strongly integrating nature and landscape values with other developments. Within building and development tasks, nature inclusive development is the standard, both in urban and rural areas. Nature inclusion will become a standard element in design activities. The area of land under nature has been increased and water conditions and environmental conditions improved. Based on the European Birds Directive and the Habitat Directive, the Netherlands is responsible for guaranteeing the continued sustainable existence of species and ecosystems. This not only applies to land but also in the marine environment where we will strive to achieve a good environmental status and sustainable and responsible use. In urban areas, there is sufficient space for nature and green, by 2050, to allow insects a good chance of survival. Soil subsidence in weak soils has been massively reduced, at the latest by 2050.”

download here the english version of the NOVI: https://denationaleomgevingsvisie.nl/publicaties/english+versions/default.aspx#folder=1451456

Award “Nature inclusive building and designing” launched

foto: website Vogelbescherming

Bird protection Netherlands has been working hard for years on a livable city for people and birds. With success: nature-inclusive building and designing is becoming increasingly popular. That is why this year, Bird Protection and the Mammal Society are presenting the Nature Including Building and Designing 2019 Award. You can submit from now on!

Link: https://www.vogelbescherming.nl/actueel/bericht/vogelbescherming-lanceert-award-natuurinclusief-bouwen

Bioloop in Delft

foto: Diny Tubbing

The city of Delft in the Netherlands is the first city with the Bioloop, a playful floating element for people to go into the water and small swimming animals to get out. The Bioloop is worked out into a design by nextcity.nl. The initial idea is made during the research project Building for Biodiversity 2015, by three students Rick Groeneveld, Liselot Rambonnet and Tom Nederstigt. Their aim is to connect people with nature in the city in a pleasant way.

The city ecologist of Delft, Diny Tubbing, adopted the idea for the project Spoorzone – Coendersbuurt. An new development area near the central station, with many canals.